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Leicester get more readies than Real Madrid

Leicester City earned €81.7m (about £73m) from the Champions League last season while title winners Real Madrid got €81.1m. Only beaten finalists Juventus earned more than the Foxes. (€110.4m).Uefa splits the cash depending on the size of each country's TV deal, how far each club progressed in the tournament and how a club performed compared to others from the same country. Leicester edged Real Madrid because the 2015-16 Premier League champions had a bigger share of broadcasting rights money - the BT deal for the UK rights is considerably higher than Spain's in terms of value.Arsenal earned €64.4m, Manchester City €50.2m and Spurs €43.3m. The growing value of winning the Europa League is emphasised by Manchester United, €44.5m, more than Tottenham, although Spurs got past the United figure by receiving an additional €2.4m for their brief spell in the Europa League.
Recent posts

West Ham's stadium move has been a mixed success

Moving into a new stadium involves some risk for a club, but often a necessary one. Southampton could not have stayed at The Dell and maintained a solid presence in the Premier League. The Emirates may be less atmospheric than Highbury, and its cost may have held the club back for a while, but it generates much needed revenue for Arsenal. The problem at Sunderland and Middlesbrough is not the new stadiums, but the football played within them. Everton's failure to move away from the faded charms of Goodison Park has held them back. Liverpool decided to rebuild Anfield rather than move to Stanley Park, but their stadium is a very special place.Manchester City's revival was helped by the move from the down market surroundings of Maine Road to the splendour of the City of Manchester Stadium, all at a very reasonable price. No doubt West Ham thought they could repeat the trick when they moved to the London Stadium in a deal which has been criticised for the level of taxpayer s…

Charlton set to become first Australian owned club

Charlton Athletic is set to become the first Australian owned club in Britain. A takeover is imminent according to fanzine Voice of the Valley, and an Australian consortium that has been interested in the club for some time look like the most likely buyers. As revealed in the fanzine, this involves businessman Andrew Muir, former owner of the Good Guys retail chain who has considerable funds at his disposal.Ramsgate fan Rick Everitt who edits the fanzine reveals, 'Voice of The Valley has been told by multiple independent and well-placed sources that due diligence on a potential sale has been taking place – and today that a deal could even go through before the end of the next week.'VOTV understands that the deal would now include the acquisition of Charlton Athletic Holdings Limited, the entity that owns The Valley and Sparrows Lane, as well the football club itself. Suggestions to the contrary were a source of concern to some fans following the initial report.Details remain …

The Premier League Division Two

An excellent piece of in depth analysis by Wigan fan Richard Pike about the Championship: New financial realities He points out that the Championship is increasingly becoming like a Premier League Division Two. One would be hard pressed to find a second tier league anywhere else in world football with so much prestige. He argues that a growing gap is emerging between the Championship and Leagues One and Two.Ten year income projections suggest that by 2027 each Championship club will receive an average of £13m each season from solidarity payments from the Premier League and the television deal, an increase of £6m on the current figure. League One clubs will see their income from these sources go up by only £0.25m from £2m. League Two clubs will see only the same £0.25m increase from £1.5m to £1.75m.He makes an interesting comparison between Sheffield United and Bolton Wanderers. Sheffield has a population of over half a million and is able to sustain two Championship clubs.One ge…

No one wants to buy Hull City

Hull may be the City of Culture but no one wants to buy the football club according to the club's owner. It is too remote and too far from London: Hull City Owner Ehab Allam said, 'The club is for sale but it seems the interest in Hull is only when the club is in the Premier League. The attraction is the Premier League. We’ve seen investment from the US and more recently from the Far East, and the interest is in the Premier League. The location of Hull isn’t attractive either. There may still be interest in some Championship clubs, such as Reading. That’s 20 minutes from Heathrow.''They’re the same people who were interested in this club but once we lost our Premier League status, they started looking for a London-based club in the Championship. The interest in Hull is limited compared to a London club, just because of lifestyle. They’re wealthy people and it has to fit in with their lifestyle aspirations as well. Buying a London club is a lot more attractive than bu…

Unique club faces new challenge

The word 'unique' is often over used, but it must surely be applied to Glasgow team Queen's Park. They are the oldest football club in Scotland and they are celebrating their 150th anniversary this year. They are the only Scottish club to win the FA Cup. They invented the modern passing game, originally referred to as 'combination' football.They are also the only amateur club playing in the Scottish professional league system. There are, of course, no amateur clubs in the English Football League and the separate amateur system in England (sometimes referred to as 'shamateur') has long since disappeared with many non-league clubs having full-time squads.Now the club faces a new challenge. They are based at the national stadium at Hampden Park which is also the home of the Scottish Football Association. However, their lease runs out in 2020 and there is uncertainty about their future there. The income that Queen's Park derives from Hampden is the b…

Ashley wants quick sale at Newcastle

It has been rumoured for some time that Mike Ashley wanted to sell Newcastle United, but now the club has been officially put on the market. After a controversial ten years at St. James' Park, which started with the Sports Direct tycoon sitting among the fans, it has all gone sour and his departure will be greeted with relief. Along the way, there have been two relegations and a controversial attempt to rename the stadium.Mike Ashley has extended only modest loans to Newcastle, preferring to spend his personal cash on property investments such as The Clearings, a former John Lewis depot in Chelsea that is being developed into fashionable apartments. His reluctance to spend money did not please the Toon Army. Mr Ashley once said that he had been advised to stay away from games for fear that he might be assaulted. He has not been to a home game this season.As the Financial Times notes today, 'Newcastle is a fiercely tribal club even by the standards of English football; fan…